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Marshall Goff

Chhabra & Gibbs, P.A. > Blog  > Marshall Goff

Teleworking & Workers’ Compensation in Mississippi – Am I Covered?

Teleworking and Workers' Compensation in Mississippi

Many businesses across the United States implemented teleworking before the COVID-19 global pandemic began. The 2019 National Compensation Survey recently found that only 7% of civilian workers in the United States have the option to telework. Now nearly all types of businesses are coming to grips with the reality that their employees could be forced to socially distance and work from home for the foreseeable future. People everywhere are converting kitchen tables, bedrooms, and areas of the home into makeshift workstations to make ends meet. The overlap between work and home begs the question of whether an employee injured while...

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Do Employers Have to Provide Workers’ Compensation Coverage in Mississippi?

Workers’ Compensation Coverage

Do employers have to provide workers' compensation coverage in Mississippi? According to statistics provided by the Mississippi Department of Employment Security, the annual average of employed Mississippi residents is over 1.1 million people. These employees work across a broad spectrum of industries and provide valuable services to our State. When one of these employees gets hurt at work, the first question that often comes up is whether or not their employer has workers’ compensation coverage insurance. The Mississippi Legislature included specific language in the Mississippi Workers’ Compensation Act that requires compensation coverage if an employer “has in service five or...

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Your Rights and Covid-19 Related Travel Cancellations

Covid-19 Related Travel Cancellations

As the Coronavirus continues to spread, many companies, such as airlines, are having Covid-19 related travel cancellations that customers have already purchased tickets for. Some consumers are not being offered a refund. Instead, airlines and other travel companies are forcing consumers to accept vouchers that can only be used with that specific airline and expire within a short period of time. Given the uncertainty surrounding the global pandemic, refusing refunds and instead requiring customers to travel within a short period of time when it still may not be safe to travel or lose out on their entire purchase amounts to a breach of the contract...

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Fired for Quarantining? Coronavirus and My Job

Coronavirus - Covid-19

As Congress passes stimulus bills to prop up our declining economy due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19), many employees are nervous about how the virus may affect their job status. Given the shutdown affect the virus will have on businesses and events in Mississippi and the nation, it is fair to assume that layoffs and downsizing will happen soon. Some employees may quarantine themselves and live in isolation because they have COVID-19 or have come into contact with someone who does. Some employers may be angry their employees are forced to quarantine and decide to fire their employees for isolating themselves. The...

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USCIS Policy Alert: Good Moral Character

Policy Alert USCIS

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) released a policy alert today to give practitioners guidance on how certain “unlawful acts” could impact a person’s ability to naturalize. A person can become a naturalized United States citizen after establishing 3-5 years as a Legal Permanent Resident (green card holder) or through military service. A person must also be eighteen years old and have “good moral character” (GMC) to complete the naturalization process. The policy alert mentioned above concerns the GMC element of the naturalization process. USCIS policy now states that the commission of, or conviction or imprisonment for, an unlawful...

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Domestic Violence & Immigration

Domestic Violence

According to a study by the Center for Disease Control (“CDC”), on average, nearly 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States. During one year, this equates to more than 10 million women and men across the United States. The prevalence of domestic violence is an unfortunate but real factor for many people. Some of the people experiencing this do not have immigration status in the United States, meaning that they are not lawfully present here. Some people can obtain status in the United States through the Violence Against Women Act or VAWA....

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Master versus Individual Hearing – What’s the Difference?

Master Hearing

Many people in removal proceedings do not realize the different types of hearings that will take place during the removal process. If you appear at an Immigration Court in front of the Executive Office of Immigration Review, chances are you are appearing for your master calendar hearing. These “master hearings” are one of the most common functions of an immigration court and are usually the first hearings a person in removal proceedings has in front of an Immigration Judge. These hearings are typically to check on the status of a case, to review the charges the government is bringing against...

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ICE & Form I-9 Audits

Audit of Form I-9

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents descended on chicken plants and other businesses in Mississippi after an investigation into alleged illegal practices by employers and employees. Part of the raid included the companies Form I-9’s being taken and reviewed by ICE agents to ensure their accuracy and compliance with federal law. Agents from ICE take custody of the employer’s documents by auditing them and assessing criminal charges or monetary fines based on inaccuracies. Employers across the Nation should be familiar with the Form I-9 to protect themselves and their businesses from a potential ICE audit. In 2018, ICE served more...

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Notice to Appear – What’s the Big Deal?

Notice to Appear Immigration

The United States government initiates removal proceedings through a Notice to Appear (“NTA”). The Immigration and Nationality Act governs what the NTA must contain in Section 239 of the Act. The NTA is what alerts someone of the charges the government is bringing against them. All NTAs must state the nature of the proceedings, meaning what conduct the government is alleging that gives them the authority to remove them from the United States. The NTA must also state the legal authority governing the proceedings. This means the government must point to specific sections of the law that describe how the...

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How Do Most People End Up In Removal Proceedings?

Removal Proceedings

At the end of the third quarter of 2019, the Executive Office for Immigration Review released statistics showing that their agency had a backlog of over 930,311 cases. Almost all of these people had dealings with a branch of the Department of Homeland Security at one point or another. DHS has three different offices dealing with immigration and enforcement, and those are U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS); U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP); or U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Each of these sub-agencies serves a different function, but any of the three can issue a Notice to Appear,...

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